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Life and Snowpeas


January 2nd, 2008

Meme of Privilege... @ 07:59 pm

temper: thankful thankful
soundtrack: Heart of Matters - Ben Harper

Ganked from valhalla_sol and spirit0fstlouis

From What Privileges Do You Have?, based on an exercise about class and privilege developed by Will Barratt, Meagan Cahill, Angie Carlen, Minnette Huck, Drew Lurker, Stacy Ploskonka at Illinois State University. If you participate in this blog game, they ask that you PLEASE acknowledge their copyright.



1. Father went to college
2. Father finished college

3. Mother went to college
4. Mother finished college
(both of them were actually the first of their families to finish university, which is kinda weird for me to imagine sometimes, since I honestly thought everyone went to university before I was about 10).
5. Have any relative who is an attorney, physician, or professor
6. Were the same or higher class than your high school teachers.
(I guess so... that wasn't ever something I considered though)
7. Had more than 50 books in your childhood home.
8. Had more than 500 books in your childhood home.
9. Were read children's books by a parent.
(I have a feeling this was my mother's major reason for having kids).
10. Had lessons of any kind before you turned 18
11. Had more than two kinds of lessons before you turned 18
12. The people in the media who dress and talk like me are portrayed positively.
(For the most part, and more in America, I find, if I consider myself in the science perspective. Biochemistry/genetics can sometimes get a bit pounded on at home. But yeah, for the most part. As for the talking.. um... people like Flight of the Conchords and their accents... right? ).
13. Had a credit card with your name on it before you turned 18.
14. Your parents (or a trust) paid for the majority of your college costs.
15. Your parents (or a trust) paid for all of your college costs
16. Went to a private high school
17. Went to summer camp (Of course, they don't exist in New Zealand, so that doesn't really count).
18. Had a private tutor before you turned 18
19. Family vacations involved staying at hotels
20. Your clothing was all bought new before you turned 18 (hahahahaha... no, I was the younger child, and we had various friends with older children. Plus Mum made the majority of our clothes when we were little. They were pretty awesome).
21. Your parents bought you a car that was not a hand-me-down from them
22. There was original art in your house when you were a child
23. You and your family lived in a single-family house (this applies to just about everyone in NZ, of course)
24. Your parent(s) owned their own house or apartment before you left home, (Well, they finally paid off the mortgage the month after I left home this year... but yeah, we certainly weren't paying rent).
25. You had your own room as a child
26. You had a phone in your room before you turned 18

27. Participated in a SAT/ACT prep course (but even if we had them in NZ, my father would have been scornful of prep courses: "i didn't do any study at all for the GREs, and I did fine...")
28. Had your own TV in your room in high school
29. Owned a mutual fund or IRA in high school or college
30. Flew anywhere on a commercial airline before you turned 16 (some of my earliest memories are flying on planes overseas.)
31. Went on a cruise with your family.
32. Went on more than one cruise with your family
33. Your parents took you to museums and art galleries as you grew up. (And churches. and graveyards. And distilleries. And looking at interesting manhole covers on the street. My mother has a wide-ranging view of 'art').
34. You were unaware of how much heating bills were for your family. (although that's more of a national obsession/consequence of having a physicist interested in energy management for a parent).

So yes... I was definitely a privileged kid. Which of course, I knew already. I got to live in all sorts of amazing places (trips overseas weren't holidays, but opportunities for dad to work at different universities... and for my sister and I to end up speaking with hilarious accents), the house was always full of books, and New Zealand is honestly one of the coolest places around to be a kid. I was really lucky, and I'm grateful for it. I also can't imagine wanting to trade any of the things I have bolded for any of the ones that I haven't... which I guess goes to show the brainwashing value of being a university brat. Books and museums beat cruises and mutual funds! Yeah... no wonder I'm sticking hard to the ivory tower, is it?

Back to New York and the weird world of grad school tomorrow morning - no more of this fresh air and exercise and other types of Canadian madness! Yay! Actually, I already want to go back to Canada and explore more (ubiquitous Australian tourists aside, it's so sane up here!) - I hear awesome things about Montreal, which is convenient, what with it being the closest to New York. Any other suggestions of particularly cool places though?
 
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Comments

 
From:spirit0fstlouis
Date:January 3rd, 2008 02:07 am (UTC)
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Montreal is worth seeing (good god, the shopping!), as is Quebec City (the old part, in particular, is gorgeous). Toronto's fun (Hayley could give you a true tourist's opinion). Ottawa's supposed to be absolutely lovely. And if you feel like making a longer trek, the East coast (New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, PEI) is fantastic.
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From:risty77
Date:January 4th, 2008 09:01 pm (UTC)
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Thanks for the tips!

My mother and sister said the same thing about Quebec city - they loved Montreal all too. They weren't so fussed on further north in Quebec, or at least on some of the inhabitants, I think.

The east coast is really wild, right? That could be very cool...
From:spirit0fstlouis
Date:January 4th, 2008 09:07 pm (UTC)
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Yeah, many of the people in Quebec leave a whooooooole lot to be desired. It's the one great big negative about the province on a whole, and why the rest of the country mocks them. ;)

The east coast is rugged and sooo beautiful. I'd love to move out there, but the economy sucks - it relies heavily on the fishing industry, which is always iffy. I'd highly recommend trying to get out there, if you can. Especially to Cape Breton and/or Newfoundland.

Life and Snowpeas